Working adults and parents enjoy financial aid for tuition and expenses at institutions like: The student loan market is no longer an exclusive realm for recently-graduated high schoolers hoping to become undergraduate college students.

Non-traditional students have access to many of the same large-scale student assistance programs that other undergraduates rely on, as well as a stable of resources that specifically target returning students and single parents.

Your school then uses information drawn from your FAFSA to determine what your on-campus funding needs are.

Unfortunately, some applicants are excluded from the get-go based on credit requirements.

Private lenders subject student borrowers to the same formal credit checks faced by other adults borrowing money, so without solid credit, you’ll need to enlist the help of a student loan cosigner.

Proper college budgeting and making prudent borrowing decisions are fundamental to meeting expenses without creating unmanageable student loan burdens for college graduates.

Lenders require credit histories that exhibit long-term credit management success.

Working adults and non-traditional college enrollees are best-served by multi-pronged approaches to landing student aid.

Federal Programs offer the deepest pockets for student borrowers, so due diligence is required pursuing traditional college financing from Uncle Sam.Students enrolled in college at least half-time are eligible for federal loans, either through the Direct Federal Loan Program or the Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP).Federal Direct Loans, subsidized and unsubsidized, are by far the most popular guaranteed loans for university students.Until recently, non-traditional college students have been forced to fend for themselves in a college assistance arena that favors recent high-school graduates.But modern social trends are creating a greater need for educational support among college students who are returning to higher education after an absence.For additional funding, students turn to state-based loans and private loans that are traditionally associated with college-aged 18-24 year olds.