Four of them are major classics: Three directed by Ernst Lubitsch and one from Rouben Mamoulien. While Miriam may not as be as well remembered today as she ought to be, she sure is a lot better remembered than Rose Hobart, the actress who did play Muriel!

A fifth, The diminutive actress from Savannah, Georgia quickly made her way from Broadway to Paramount and spent the first few years of the 1930s in just about every sexual situation that could be brought to the screen. Hopkins caused a bit of a sensation with her initial meeting of Fredric March's Dr.

Just the title alone of her first feature, Chevalier's character is manipulated into marrying Hopkins' Princess, despite the fact that he'd much rather remain shacked up with Colbert's Franzi. Jekyll: She's completely nude and under the covers in a few minutes, famously swaying her bare leg as Jekyll leaves and imploring, "Come back," in what is practically a sex starved hiss.

William Wyler directed from a screenplay by Ruth and Augustus Goetz, adapting their own play, which in turn was based on Henry James' novel , which happens to be one of the most “adult” movies of the 1930s – even if not quite as adult as it would have been had they been allowed to keep the lesbian subplot found in Lillian Hellman's play.

In this bowdlerized version, bratty Bonita Granville's lie has to do with a love triangle involving Hopkins, Merle Oberon (right, who's also quite good), and Joel Mc Crea.

Miriam Hopkins, one of the most underrated performers of the studio era, will have her “Summer Under the Stars” day on Thursday, August 20, 2009.

Turner Classic Movies will present fourteen Miriam Hopkins films, including one TCM premiere – the Samuel Goldwyn production of lease the Universal library, which contains both the Universal and Paramount classics – it's great to have a day dedicated to an actress who, no matter how good, has been usually dismissed because of her (alleged) off-screen behavior.

artisans and technicians' glossy work, and Hopkins' well-etched, mature performance turn a potentially sickening melo into an emotionally gripping cautionary tale.

(Kennedy quotes Goulding as saying that “whatever respect they [Hopkins and Davis] had for each other as professionals was quickly thrown out of the window when one or the other didn't get her way.

This is one I hope to cover in detail by the end of the year, so for now I'll just say that Hopkins' Lily and Marshall's Monescu fall in love as they prove their talents to one another in opening scene, one of the sexiest and cleverest starts to any movie in history. (1933) on the site, though more in praise of Jack La Rue than anything else.

They soon move in on Francis' Madame Colet, but as they work towards their master plan Lily is thrown a curve when Monescu falls for the wealthy Colet. While William Gargan is as forgettable as La Rue is memorable in the film, it is Miriam's Temple that is the focus.

It's Tom who strikes first when Gilda finagles to get one of his plays accepted and produced in London.