Does your library have a neat service we should know about? And many thanks to everyone who has sent in examples so far.

The Kent Free Library in Ohio “has hosted ‘Technology Petting Zoos’ to give patrons and community members a chance to have hands-on interaction with a variety of tablets and e-readers.

Additionally, the Skokie media lab has a green screen wall for video projects.” According to the American Library Association, 35% of U. public libraries offer one-on-one technology and/or research help with library staff.

The Arapahoe Library District in Colorado offers Book-a-Librarian help in English, Spanish and Russian.

Released: January 29, 2013 By Kathryn Zickuhr Our new report takes a close look not only at how Americans are using public libraries, but also what sort of services and programming they think libraries should offer — and what they say they would use in the future.

For this last point, we asked about a range of potential offerings, including online “ask a librarian”-type research service, mobile library apps, library kiosks in the community, and pre-loaded e-readers available for checkout.

Using this technology, users are able to hold up their mobile phones and see archival photos layered on top of the images visible through the camera’s phone.

In 2012, the American Library Association recognized the library for offering cutting-edge technologies in library services.” The Cuyahoga County Public Library of Parma, Ohio “created CCPL Mobile, an exciting new mobile app that enhances the library patron experience by giving patrons access to the unprecedented convenience of checking out items using their smart phones.

The book dispensaries at available 24/7 and operate like ATM machines with a swipe of a library card to dispense books.

Users can have up to three books checked out at a time and return the books to the Library-a-Go-Go machines.” According to the library, “The automated library vending machines have been successful in expanding a library’s presence into areas where they could not traditionally reach.” The Carson City Library Branch Anywhere in Nevada “provides patrons at the Boys and Girls Clubs of Western Nevada with access to current library materials, digital tools and librarian-educator programming.

The library frequently hosts ‘technology petting zoos’ to teach patrons how to use the CCPL tool, e-readers and e-audiobooks in the downloadable collection.” The Contra Costa County Library in California has a “Snap & Go” project that allows users with mobile phone to access various library services via scanned QR codes.

“By reaching otherwise time-pressed users while they are waiting in public spaces (at bus stations and buses), the library has managed to stretch its resources even while budgets tighten.

The free CCPL Mobile smartphone app features a Digital Books & Media channel that makes finding and downloading e-books and e-audiobooks from the library’s collection.