Like most dating methods used by secularists, many assumptions are built into their speculations and hypotheses.All the assumptions mentioned above presume the secularists’ deep-time bias about conditions they haven’t observed.The amount of light produced is proportional to the number of trapped electrons that have been freed which is in turn proportional to the radiation dose accumulated.

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Thermoluminescence dating (TL) is the determination, by means of measuring the accumulated radiation dose, of the time elapsed since material containing crystalline minerals was either heated (lava, ceramics) or exposed to sunlight (sediments).

As a crystalline material is heated during measurements, the process of thermoluminescence starts.

The Radiation Dose Rate - the dose accumulated per year-must be determined first.

This is commonly done by measurement of the alpha radioactivity (the uranium and thorium content) and the potassium content (K-40 is a beta and gamma emitter) of the sample material.

At this point, the method seems to be a straightforward concept.

However, problems arise from assuming a uniform radiation dose rate over any significant period of time and assuming that the TMRD resulted from the object or artifact being in a strictly constrained environment identical to that in which it was found.

In thermoluminescence dating, these long-term traps are used to determine the age of materials: When irradiated crystalline material is again heated or exposed to strong light, the trapped electrons are given sufficient energy to escape.

In the process of recombining with a lattice ion, they lose energy and emit photons (light quanta), detectable in the laboratory.

Where there is a dip (a so-called "electron trap"), a free electron may be attracted and trapped.